Aug 11 2016

CNC machine Attachments

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When you first buy (or build) a CNC machine your primary concern when working on your budget is likely going to be figuring out what the best quality parts you can afford are. Every machinist, from professionals to hobbyists, wants to get the best CNC machine that they can in order to make machining processes as smooth as possible. While you should certainly concern yourself with the necessary parts of the machine first, so that it can actually run, there are additional considerations you can take. Attachments (or accessories, add-ons, or whatever you wish to call them) may not technically be essential to the running of a CNC machine but once you start using them they can be so beneficial that they will certainly start to feel like necessary components.

Some attachments are so common that many machinists would likely argue that they are essential components to any CNC machine. Ruin boards are a great example of an attachment that fit into this category. Image that you have your CNC machine set up and you are ready to machine your first project on your nice, new t-slot table. With what you just paid for that t-slot table you can picture what a nightmare it would be to accidently cut right into the table and destroy it. Keeping a ruin board between the table and your material should stop this from ever happening. Ruin boards do not need to be too thick; usually something between ⅛” and ¼” will work fine. New machinists may want to use a thicker board to leave more room for error.

CNC machine clamps

CNC machine clamps

Clamps are another great, yet simple, attachment that most basic CNC machines should include. Any level of precision machining will require you to hold your material still. There are a lot of ways to do this and clamps are one of the easier and more cost efficient methods. Sometimes you may have other methods available; t-slot tables utilize t-slot nuts, step blocks, step clamps and other implementations but it can be a hassle to find pieces that fit the specific table you are using. Making a clamping system of your own can be much more effective. Be creative and try to develop an easy-to-use system that works well with your equipment and set-up.
In some cases clamps may not be a good hold-down method because the item you are machining is too small. When you find that your clamps are too large, a milling vice is an excellent alternative tool. While a regular vice could be jury rigged to your table, a milling vice is designed specifically to work with a CNC machine table and they tend to be extremely precise. There are many different types and brands of milling vices in many different sizes so determine your needs and do a bit of research before committing to anything expensive.





Once you have a hold-down system in place you can start actually machining. On any project you want to make sure that everything has been machined accurately and there is no set of tools better for this than a pair of calipers. Digital calipers are the way to go for their extreme precision; 0” – 6” calipers will work fine for the vast majority of measurements you need to take while examining the finer details of projects. Cheaper calipers work fine but like any other tool you will want to go for the higher end of tool quality and price range as your budget allows.

 air sprayer for cnc machine

air sprayer for cnc machine

During and after machining, chip evacuation will be one of your primary concerns. Using an air sprayer is the best way to clear out chips while your CNC machine is running. Any standard air compressor with a trigger nozzle can do this well. Clearing away chips during the cutting process is often a critical procedure. After your machining has been completed you will want to use a shop vac’s powerful suction to get all of the chips out of your work area, leaving everything crisp and clean for your next project. Any time you are working with chips, and when using a CNC machine in general, always remember to wear safety goggles.


Jul 28 2016

Plastics routing

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Modern plastics vary greatly throughout their manufacturing processes. The differences between various types of plastics and the different uses machinists will have for their materials cause problems for some people. A good machinist, whether you are a hobbyist or a professional, should be aware of the problems you could run into and steps you can take to get around those problems.

Not all plastics are made equal, not even plastics that share the same name when you are purchasing your raw materials. Something as simple as a change in color can alter how one plastic cuts compared to another. You need to be able to recognize and classify what kinds of categories plastic falls under when you are working with it. To start, determine whether you are working with hard or soft plastic. This is easy to determine; you can check this by seeing how rigid or flexible your material is. Alternatively you can see what type of chip is produced when the material is cut. Soft plastic chips will curl while hard plastic chips retain their solid shape. A single type of plastics is not always universally hard or soft; some plastics can be hard or soft depending on how they were manufactured. Knowing the geometry of your cutting tool is the second step to success. Tools that are best suited for cutting plastic have high rake and low clearance. These days there are thousands of different tools made for plastics cutting that you can choose from. Soft plastics tools have “O” shapes and are usually straight or spiraled in shape. Hard plastics tools can have an “O”, spiral shape or a “V”, straight shape.

Routing plastics

Routing plastics

One of the most irritating problems you can run into is the plastics material welding. This problem can happen due to the direction of your cut, using a cutting tool that is too small or having a chipload (the thickness of a chip) that is too large. Chipload is the most common cause of this problem. Your chipload is determined by your spindle speed, feed rate and the number of edges on your cutting tool. In plastic routing you want your chips to be just the right size to distribute heat correctly. Another potential problem is your finished project having poor finish. Having good finish is extremely important on plastic items, especially ones that are made to be put on display somewhere. The quality of your finish is going to be heavily affected by your chipload. Problems aside from chipload tend to come from the condition of your CNC router. You want to make sure that your CNC router is up to speed on maintenance and performance at all times. Learning to work with plastic correctly is a matter of practice and with time you will become experienced enough that you will run into these problems less and less, until you stop running into them almost altogether.




Making sure you have the right bits for plastics is one of the most important parts of preparing for projects. Your best option for hard plastics is a solid carbide router tool. If you cannot get one of those a carbide tipped tool is a good second choice but they will not perform as well as a solid carbide tool. You can use the same kind of tools on soft plastics but high speed steel tools will also work well on these softer materials. Your CNC router should be capable of speeds of at least 15,000 RPM to work on plastic. A CNC router is the best type of CNC machine for working on plastic, being the machine that is best suited for working at the high speeds your projects will require. Ideally you want to be working at 18,000 RPM, if your machine can operate at that speed, at a feed rate of 200 in. per minute. This is a general figure for plastics in general and the exact speed and feed rate you should use will vary a bit between different types of plastic.


Jul 14 2016

DIY – Discovering a new hobby

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Sometimes it feels like our childhood ended quite soon. We were burdened with education and sent to college. After that, all we could think of was getting a job and being financially stable. Well, now you have achieved that, you have got the time to discover some new hobbies. The best option you have id ‘Do It Yourself’ (DIY) projects. Let’s know more about it.

DO it yourself (DIY)

DO it yourself

Benefits of DIY as a hobby
We should start with knowing why it is the best option. DIY has numerous benefits. Some of them are enlisted below.
1. While working on a DIY project, you are the boss. You can implement your ideas and your methods freely. This is a great privilege for those who are working at a place where they have to do exactly as told. By working on something of your own, you will be able to feel the liberty.
2. The projects will actually serve some purpose. While most of the hobbies, like movies or sports, are only for passing the free time, DIY will get some work done. Suppose you need some piece of furniture for your living room, rather than hiring someone to build it, you can do it yourself.
3. There have been a few cases where people have created something innovated through a DIY project and have made some money by selling it in the market. If you are able to create something new or modify an old thing to serve a better purpose, you might be able get some profit out of it.
4. It is a great way to bond with your loved ones. If you are able to get your kids or friends involved in your project, you will get to spend some quality time with them. And creating something new together always strengthens the bond between two people.
5. You can fulfill many childhood dreams by taking up DIY as a hobby. For instance, there are many people who have always wanted a video game cabinet. Not everybody can afford a new one. But the DIY kits for these machines are quite cheaper. If you build it yourself, it will not just be cheaper but also a lot more satisfactory.

Finding the right DIY project
There are numerous websites that sell these projects. You can browse through them and take a look at all the options. You can even talk to your friends. You might find someone who has been doing this for a while. They will be able to recommend some projects to you. Also, you can join forums or blogs that focus only on DIY. You will learn about some popular projects. You can even use a search engine to find out about the most popular projects. Once you have found a few good options, you will need to select one from them. To take this decision, you can take the following things into account. It will help you take the right decision.

1. Required skills: Every project requires different skills. The basic ones need you to be comfortable with screwdrivers and drilling machines while you need to have good knowledge of computers and electronics for the advanced projects. So, you should select the project, according to your skill set. Otherwise, you will be stuck in between without any clue about what to do next. It is better to start something you can complete.

2. Affordability: There will be a bunch of different things that you will have to buy to start a project. The most important things are the tools and the material. Once you get these things, you can start. But there are several other things that you will need along the way. You should plan according to that. Suppose you have 100 bucks, start the project that takes 75 bucks according to your initial estimates.

3. Time needed: If you start counting all the things that you started with great enthusiasm but soon left it due to a busy schedule, the list might get quite long. So, select a project that is not too long. Otherwise, you will soon get bored and leave it. At least the initial projects should be short. Once you have gained complete interest in DIY, you can take on bigger projects too.


Jul 7 2016

Climb and conventional milling secrets that you should know

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When a cutter moves through material it can mill up (conventional milling) or down (climb milling). Many machinists use climb milling for most, if not all, of their CNC projects. Climb milling is known for producing better surface finish than conventional milling and overall does have more advantages than conventional. However, climb is not always the better of the two options and any machinist should know that there are times when conventional is preferable, and when those times are.

Climb and Conventional Milling

Climb and Conventional Milling

Using climb milling, each tooth on your cutting tool makes contact with the material you are working with at a defined point and moves out, cutting thinner parts of the material until it is no longer touching the material. So, the width of the material being cut starts at the maximum length and decreases to zero as the cutter moves. This causes chips to be thrown behind the cutter, making chip removal an easier process while machining. Tool life is also extended because each tooth on the cutter is not rubbing against the material. One of the major downsides of climb milling is that it can potentially produce a lot of backlash. As a result this method should mainly be used on machines that can eliminate large amounts of backlash and it may not always be usable with older CNC machines.
Conventional cuts in the opposite direction of climb. Using conventional milling, the teeth of the cutter will start at zero thickness and work their way up to the maximum thickness that you are cutting. When first making contact with the material your cutter does not even cut the material; it slides across the material surface until enough pressure is built up for the tooth to dig in and begin cutting. This causes the work material to become hard and somewhat deformed and also causes cutters to dull faster than when using climb. The sliding and biting of this cutting process also tends to leave an inadequate surface finish on work materials. On the upside this process does not generate anywhere near as much backlash as climb and is a perfectly sound cutting method on almost any CNC machine. The two methods do not have to be used independently either; climb can be used for rough passes while conventional milling is used for finishing passes.
Climb does have a few distinct advantages over conventional when your machine can manage it. As mentioned before, your tool life will be longer, surface finish will be better and chip removal is much easier. Additionally, you do not need as advanced of a hold-down system. Climb exerts force downwards instead of upwards like conventional milling. You can also use higher rake angles while climb milling, saving you a little money on the amount of power needed. Just do not forget about the excessive backlash when looking at all of the positives of climb milling.
When using climb milling, deflection can causes some problems with surface finish. Climb cutting causes tools to deflect, deforming the surface finish of projects and leaving you with less than adequate results. If you run into this issue try switching to conventional cutting; that will likely make a big enough difference to correct any issues you are having with maintaining a good surface finish. While conventional cutting can help it will not always fix your problems. If you have tried climb cutting and conventional cutting and are still having issues you can decrease deflection further by reducing the depth of your cuts. Using a small amount of your cutters diameter will make it less likely that you will experience any deflection.


Jun 23 2016

Easter egg design with Eggbot & CNC Egg Decorating

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Easter egg design with Eggbot & CNC Egg Decorating

Decorating eggs is an age old past time for children, especially in the spring when it starts getting close to Easter(easter egg design). Traditionally, you would take an egg and color it by hand. But like many older past times, this task has been made faster, better and more efficient through the innovation of modern technology. This particular CNC machine may have a very specific function but it is a basic machine that serves as a good way to teach CNC technologies to children and young adults. The name of this machine is the EggBot.

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